A new legal strategy shows us Robert Mueller desperately trying to cast a net wide enough to catch someone.

Is Robert Mueller desperately trying to make legal behavior into a crime. A Washington Times reports suggest he is doing so by using the charge, “conspiracy to defraud government.”

In my opinion, Robert Mueller should be fired. The Special Prosecuter investigation should be shut down.

The investigation is nething more than an effort to give hysteria and lies the appearance of legal reality.

The Washington Times reports, “Mueller invokes unusual ‘conspiracy to defraud government’ charge to ensnare more targets.

Last month, Mr. Mueller, a Republican and former FBI director indicted 13 Russian nationals connected to the Internet Research Agency (IRA) Russian “troll farm,” accusing the IRA of interfering in the 2016 U.S. presidential election by spreading fake news stories through U.S. social media. The same approach was employed in securing a plea deal last month with Rick Gates, the aide for former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort.

What has attracted attention in legal circles is the underlying legal theory behind the indictments, accusing the Russians of essentially committing a crime by preventing agencies of the U.S. government from carrying out the duties. Mr. Mueller appears to be leveraging the theory “into a powerful instrument with respect to both foreign and domestic actors,” according to a recent article on Lawfare, a national security blog by the Lawfare Institute and Brookings Institution.

Emma Kohse, Harvard International Law Journal editor-in-chief, Benjamin Wittes, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and the Lawfare blog’s top editor, argue that, based in the language of the indictments and the legal precedents behind them, the “conspiracy to defraud the government” charge provides the Mueller team with significant flexibility in trying to build a case against Mr. Trump and members of his 2016 campaign.


“To allege that a new conspirator had joined such a conspiracy, Mueller would have to allege only that such a person — presumably a new defendant — had agreed to participate in a scheme of deceit by which the FEC, the Justice Department or the State Department was deprived of its regulatory authority,” Ms. Kohse and Mr. Wittes write.

Following that line of legal logic, any Americans who knowingly assisted the IRA troll farm — by feeding them information or directing them on how to employ that information — would be taking part in its scheme “to influence the U.S. election behind the back of the U.S. government.” They would thus be guilty of committing a crime — even if what they though they were doing was legal.

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